Concerned about Coronavirus?

We are too. That's why at Harpeth Pediatrics our providers offer in-office testing and stay up to date with the latest CDC recommendations in our practice. Read here to learn more about our response to COVID-19.

FAQs about COVID-19

We are now doing testing for COVID-19, both rapid molecular testing in our office as well as sending tests out to a lab when needed. There is no need to go to a walk-in clinic. Ask our staff for more details.

Call us. Most children recover well at home. As you care for your child at home, be on the lookout for any changes in their health. Call us if your child gets worse, has trouble breathing or seems confused. Your goal is to help your child feel more comfortable. Keep a close eye on them, watch for any signs of serious illness and make sure they drink enough liquids. Your child should stay away from others for 10 days from the start of symptoms AND until their fever and other symptoms have been gone for at least 24 hours without taking any fever-lowering medicines. Other people in your household should also stay away from others for 10 days while monitoring for symptoms of COVID-19.

For further details, please see Discontinuation of isolation for persons with COVID-19, not in healthcare settings on the CDC website.

Definition of exposure per CDC is an individual that has had close contact (less than 6 feet) for greater than 15 minutes with or without a mask.

Keep them at home for 10 days after the last exposure, always maintaining social distance from other members in the house at all times and monitor for symptoms. Your child may be released early after 7 days of quarantine with a negative test after day 5 as long as they remain asymptomatic.

Your child will not necessarily need to be tested for COVID-19 unless he/she starts to have symptoms. We are now testing in our office for COVID-19. Ask your provider what option is best for you.

If your child did not spend more than 10 minutes in close proximity to the person who tested positive, then you should watch and check carefully for signs of illness, but he/she can go back to school as usual (following all preventative measures including wearing a mask at all times).

Our goal is to create an environment in our office that is “COVID free”.

We have implemented significant safety procedures to minimize any risk of infection. We have established clinical protocols to determine if a patient should be tested according to the CDC protocols. We have created an isolation area for patients that suspect Coronavirus. We have separate entrances for well and sick patients with patients’ cars serving as a virtual waiting room for all sick patients.

Our entire team has ongoing education on ways to stop the spread of germs and are following specific protocols throughout our office. We ask that only one parent, and no siblings, come for your child’s checkup when possible. We are happy to FaceTime with the other parent while your child is here!

We have removed all books, magazines, and toys from the lobby and each exam room. All staff involved in direct patient care are wearing masks and we ask that you do the same. Rooms are cleaned thoroughly between patients and the office is deep cleaned nightly.

These are our screening questions that we have posted and ask patients when making appointments:

  1. Have you experienced any of the following symptoms in the past 48 hours? Fever or chills; Cough; Shortness of breath or difficulty breathing; Fatigue; Muscle or body aches; Headache; New loss of taste or smell; Sore throat; Congestion or runny nose; Nausea or vomiting; or Diarrhea.
  2. Within the past 14 days, have you been in close physical contact (6 feet or closer for at least 15 minutes) with a person who is known to have laboratory-confirmed COVID-19 or with anyone who has any symptoms consistent with COVID-19?
  3. Are you isolating or quarantining because you may have been exposed to a person with COVID-19 or are worried that you may be sick with COVID-19?
  4. Are you currently waiting on the results of a COVID-19 test?
  5. Have you or anyone in your household traveled in the past 14 days?

Yes! We are delivering Telehealth for many types of visits. We can help you with certain illnesses and infections, feeding concerns, medications follow ups, allergies, asthma, ADD/ADHD follow ups, emotional problems such as anxiety or depression, and many more issues. Most insurances are covering these visits like they would if you were seen in our office. Verify with your specific plan if they cover Telehealth. We will also do these visits as self-pay if your insurance does not cover.

Currently we are using Microsoft Teams to do Telehealth. This is the link to download the Microsoft Teams App onto your computer, which we will be using for your appointment. https://teams.microsoft.com/ You can also download the App to your phone. Just search for Microsoft Teams.

Children and COVID-19

Encourage students and staff to take every day preventative actions like staying home when sick, covering coughs and sneezes, wearing masks, cleaning and disinfecting frequently touched surfaces, and washing hands often with soap and water or hand sanitizer with at least 60% alcohol. We also recommend that students and staff have symptom and temperature screening before entering the building.

High-Risk Conditions for Severe Illness from COVID-19:

  • Chronic kidney disease
  • COPD (Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease)
  • Immunocompromised state (weakened immune system) from solid organ transplant
  • Obesity (body mass index [BMI] of 30 or higher)
  • Serious heart conditions, such as heart failure, coronary artery disease or cardiomyopathies
  • Sickle cell disease
  • Diabetes mellitus

Children who are medically complex, who have neurologic, genetic, metabolic conditions, or who have congenital heart disease are at higher risk for severe illness from COVID-19 than other children. The overall death rate is low among children (less than 1% of those who become ill), but the long-term consequences of the disease remain unknown. Other conditions that are less well studied but might put someone in a higher risk category can be found on the CDC website.

Children should be suspected of having COVID- 19 if they have

  1. fever AND cough or shortness of breath, OR
  2. cough or shortness of breath and exposure to someone with COVID-19 in the last 14 days.

If they had exposure to someone with COVID-19 also look out for less common symptoms like runny or stuffy nose, shortness of breath, or belly trouble like throwing up or diarrhea. Testing may or may not be needed for children with these less common symptoms.

Check your child’s temperature at home every morning using a thermometer. If your child has a temperature of 100.4 or higher, he/she should stay home and be tested for COVID-19 if there is not another clear reason for their fever. Other symptoms to ask your child about or monitor for are cough, runny or stuffy nose, shortness of breath, or belly troubles like throwing up or diarrhea. If they have any of these symptoms, keep them home from school and consider having them tested for COVID-19. Other common reasons for cough and runny nose: Common cold/other viruses, Croup, Seasonal allergies, and Asthma.

Need more Information?

For the latest and most up to date information, visit the Tennessee Department of Health website or the CDC website.

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